Tag Archives: teenagers

Think Before You Post!

Fellow blogger, Alexis Lane, tweeted about an article called “Talk to Teens About Being Responsible on Social Media.”

Teenagers growing up in this technological age now find social media to be a way of life. Are there dangers involved in this? They need to keep in mind that the footprint they leave on social media can have an impact their futures.

“I tell my kids every horror story I hear of students being rejected from college or an accepted student having his/her admission rescinded because of something they wrote on Facebook or something they tweeted. It is very hard to eliminate a ‘social footprint,'” Laurie Weingarten, mother of two teenagers, said.

Once something is deleted from the internet, is it ever actually gone?

30_hour_famine_study_social_media_teens

It is so important to pay attention to the things that are posted on these websites. You never know how one slip-up can effect you in the future.

The article makes it clear that college admissions officers do in fact look at applicants social media pages to learn more about them. Adults need to make kids aware of this before they begin to make their online footprint. If they see something that they dislike, even something so minor, they can immediately decide to kick that applicant to the curb. Colleges do not want someone with a bad online reputation to represent their institution.

It is so important for teenagers to learn ways to use social media responsibly. A parent suggests that a good way to make teens aware of the existing issues is to make them feel uncomfortable about it. Do this by continuously asking them about their cyber life. Another suggestion is to ask your child for help using a social media app. This way, you can really get a glimpse of what they’re doing on social media, and how they go about using it.

By staying involved in their child’s usage, parents can really see if there are prevalent issues. Then, they can be addressed right at the start. By doing this, teens will become a lot more contentious about their usage.

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“The Fire Challenge”

We have all heard stories about people doing stupid stunts for the sake of getting “liked” on social media. Remember the cinnamon challenge, anyone? What appeared as an innocent stunt has sent dozens to the emergency room with collapsed lungs, bleeding noses, and poisoned airways. The popularity of these challenges proves that people utilize social media as a mechanism for popularity. However, the thousands of dollars, television appearances and world-wide recognition is a veneer for the danger simmering just below the surface.

A Twitter user commented that “Rituals (YouTube challenges) of the digital culture are becoming life threatening.” His comment was followed by an article outlining the newest trend, the “fire challenge”. As described by Caitlin Dewey, it “consists of pouring rubbing alcohol on oneself, lighting it on fire, and putting the resulting blaze out before you sustain third-degree burns and/or burn your house down.”

Sounds lovely, right? Wrong.

A fifteen-year old from Kentucky, who received second-degree burns after attempting the stunt, warns others against it. He says, “You can get caught on fire and die. Your house can get caught on fire. Wherever you’re at could get caught on fire.” This does not sound fun at all, yet teenagers everywhere are rising to the challenge. The dangerous thing about these stunts being advertised via Youtube and Facebook, are that the risks are not being associated with them. Teenaged participants, often struggling with fitting in, feel that accomplishing these challenges skyrocket their popularity. They forget that they are not as invincible as they assume.

While social media is a great tool for sharing material, users need to be more careful to screen information. Risks need to be clarified. The danger involved in these stunts cannot be felt online; the challenged cannot feel the heat of the fire until it consumes them.

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